Home / Blog

Fines for firms with poor cyber-security 3

Blockchain and the Law Blog 3

Jonathan Yovel, Haifa Law School.
Blockchain is here to stay. Even its greatest detractors admit, that this unique architecture that eschews any central control of data has only just scratched the surface of possibilities. Distributed ledgers promise not only iron-clad security and data integrity (is iron that clad, however?) but irrevocability as well; hence lays both their promise and a certain confusion regarding the proper legal mode of governing them.
But before I discuss law, I want to articulate a certain approach, or perspective, on blockchain as technology, that I think will be valuable going forward.

Blockchain is here to stay. Even its greatest detractors admit, that this unique architecture that eschews any central control of data has only just scratched the surface of possibilities. Distributed ledgers promise not only iron-clad security and data integrity (is iron that clad, however?) but irrevocability as well; hence lays both their promise and a certain confusion regarding the proper legal mode of governing them.
But before I discuss law, I want to articulate a certain approach, or perspective, on blockchain as technology, that I think will be valuable going forward.

Blockchain is here to stay. Even its greatest detractors admit, that this unique architecture that eschews any central control of data has only just scratched the surface of possibilities. Distributed ledgers promise not only iron-clad security and data integrity (is iron that clad, however?) but irrevocability as well; hence lays both their promise and a certain confusion regarding the proper legal mode of governing them.
But before I discuss law, I want to articulate a certain approach, or perspective, on blockchain as technology, that I think will be valuable going forward.

Blockchain is here to stay. Even its greatest detractors admit, that this unique architecture that eschews any central control of data has only just scratched the surface of possibilities. Distributed ledgers promise not only iron-clad security and data integrity (is iron that clad, however?) but irrevocability as well; hence lays both their promise and a certain confusion regarding the proper legal mode of governing them.
But before I discuss law, I want to articulate a certain approach, or perspective, on blockchain as technology, that I think will be valuable going forward.